Rules For Walkers – click to open or close

  • You (including visitors) must register on the Walk Report form, which includes a risk acknowledgement.
  • Advise the leader of any physical or other limitation, or any dependence on medication, that may require urgent attention during the activity (eg insect allergy medication)
  • There is a limit of 3 walks as a visitor – after this, visitors must apply for membership.
  • Discuss your suitability with the leader beforehand if you plan on participating in a walk of a higher grade than you have done before.
  • No person under the age of 18 can participate in a BBC walk unless accompanied by a parent, guardian or other adult who is either a close relative, or authorised by the parent or guardian. This ‘responsible person’ must sign a modified activity sign-in form.
  • Dogs and firearms are not allowed.
  • Bring lunch and plenty to drink — a minimum of 1 litre per adult and 1.5 litres per child in normal weather, and 2-3 litres for hot weather.
  • Dress appropriately and always bring a hat, waterproof jacket or coat, and warm clothing, e.g., polar-fleece, thermals, gloves and warm headgear, for unexpected cold weather.
  • Strong footwear with thick treaded soles is recommended. Walking boots with thick socks are best; joggers may be adequate for easy and medium terrain; if in doubt, contact the walk leader.
  • Some first aid needs arise more often than others: sunburn, thorn pricks, insect bites, abrasions and bruising from falls, blisters, heat exhaustion through not drinking enough, and sprains and strains from slipping on rock or wet wood. Snake bite is always a possibility.  Walkers must carry a first aid kit containing, as the minimum, a wide compression bandage (for snake bites, sprains and breaks), some wide micropore surgical tape (all-purpose), bandaids and pain killers.
  • Carry everything in a backpack so that both hands are free.
  • Keep together. Use the same route as the leader and do not get ahead of or behind the party. Keep the walker in front and behind in sight – call the leader to stop if necessary. If the party is large, a tail person is usually appointed to monitor slower walkers. The most common causes of separation are getting ahead of the leader, stopping to take photos or making a toilet stop without telling anyone. Do not assume you can drop behind and then easily catch up.
  • If you do become separated, stop and call out. Do not keep walking. Wait in a visible place even if you have to wait some time. The leader will return for you. Call out at intervals.
  • Be aware of fellow walkers – if a problem is apparent, advise the leader.
  • Let the leader know if you are having any difficulties.
  • If you want to leave the walk for any reason, you must consult the leader first – and abide by the leader’s ruling. Do not assume you will get approval.
  • The club endorses minimum impact bushwalking. Avoid damaging the bush environment, leave absolutely no litter, and do not burn plastics or aluminium in fires.
  • Call for a stop at the first sign of a blister or other injury. The party will gladly stop for a rest while any necessary first aid is given. If you use someone else’s supplies, replace them.
  • If the leader is making a head count, assist by standing still.
  • Avoid using mobile phones. If you must, then move well away from others.